Lost Ways Article

RESTORING THE RECORD or “FINDING THE MISSING LINKS”

 

On 1st January 2026, it will no longer be possible to use historic map and documentary evidence to claim ‘lost ways’.   Any path, track, alleyway, bridleway, cut-through etc. not registered on the Definitive Map – or submitted for registration – could well be in danger of being lost   Even old and still well-used, but officially unrecorded, routes may be at risk.

What does this actually mean to those who walk, cycle or horse ride along our public footpaths and bridleways?  The basic message is stark – we take our access to the countryside for granted; we use routes for recreation and as a means of linking places together without thinking but, if we don’t check what we already have or what has been used in the past and that it is legally recorded, we could lose them forever.  The ancient maxim on which many claimants have relied, in the past: “once a highway always a highway” will be history.

Simply put, a small strip of land between a highway and the start of a definitive path might be unregistered.   After 2026, a landowner could put a gate or fence across it and restrict all entry to the public – quite legally – thus permanently hindering access to the countryside because we have assumed, but not checked, that the Definitive Map is up-to-date and accurate.   It will not be just our generation which will suffer but those who follow after us and is that the legacy we wish to leave them?   It is worth the risk?

The ‘Restoring the Records’ project is two-pronged with something for everyone; volunteers are needed to check maps, walk paths to ensure the correct signs are in place, do research, interview local people about their memories and get new links approved – to list just a few activities and it is local knowledge that will be the key.

 The plan is to recruit a volunteer [s] in every Buckinghamshire Parish and Town Council to spread the load and speed up the exercise – 10 years passes far quicker than you might think!   No previous knowledge or training is needed; the Project Team is preparing a simple step-by-step guide which will answer most of the more common questions and will supply a map of your local area showing the rights of way.

If you are interested in becoming involved in this fascinating and very important treasure hunt, please contact Ross Osborn, the Project’s Volunteer Co-ordinator, on rossosborn41@gmail.com who will be happy to answer any questions and arrange for all necessary information and maps to be sent to you.

October 27, 2016Permalink

Theatre In The Villages (2016)

Theatre and entertainment in village halls across Buckinghamshire

What is it?

Theatre in the Villages is a rural touring scheme that brings professional theatre and entertainment to village halls across Buckinghamshire.

It relies on volunteers to manage all aspects of putting on a show in their own village – from choosing the play, to selling the tickets.

When are the shows?

Theatre in the Villages returns in the autumn from September until December.

This year in AkeleyCat Weatherill 4

More information about all the shows – Theatre in the Villages 2016

You can also follow the Theatre in the Villages accounts on social media.

 

 

 

August 24, 2016Permalink

Thames Valley Alert – See it? Report it. Don’t wait! – Aylesbury Vale

thames_valley This is a message sent via Thames Valley Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Thames Valley Police

Message sent by
Naveenat Sahota (Police, Local Comms, Thames Valley)

The Aylesbury Vale Neighbourhood Policing Team is asking residents to report any suspicious activity to us immediately in order to tackle rural crime, gather vital intelligence and target rural offenders.

Rural crime remains a high priority for Thames Valley Police and the Aylesbury LPA is committed to supporting and protecting rural communities that often feel vulnerable and isolated. The neighbourhood policing teams will not be complacent and continue to actively police the rural areas of Aylesbury Vale in order to disrupt and deter criminal activity.
The Force Intelligence Bureau is working closely with rural communities to build up an overall intelligence picture surrounding rural crime. Gathering intelligence and information is a vital part of investigating crime and it can’t be done without the public’s help. It is this intelligence which will allow us to find, prosecute and convict the people who are committing the crimes which are affecting rural communities the most.
Insp James Davies, said: “We value input from the public to gather intelligence and help us progress police investigations related to rural offending.Your local policing team will have a better chance of catching people committing rural crime offences, if the incident is reported at the time and there are no delays.
“It’s also extremely important to report anything you might find unusual or suspicious, however unimportant it may seem at the time, as soon as you see it. Please don’t wait to make the call”.
If you have information or intelligence you would like to share with Thames Valley Police, no matter how big or small, please either email FIBruralcrime@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk or call the 24 hour, non-emergency number 101. If you believe it is a crime in progress, please always dial 999.
If you don’t want to speak directly to the police you can contact the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or online at www.crimestoppers-uk.org. (opens new window) No personal details are taken, information is not traced or recorded and you will not go to court.
This post can also be viewed on the ‘Neighbourhood and Policing’ page by clicking here.
July 11, 2014Permalink

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive

The Government has announced that the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is open for applications.
The RHI is a long-term financial support programme for renewable heat, offering homeowners payments to offset the cost of installing low carbon systems in their properties. The scheme is open to everyone – home owners, social and private landlords, and people who build their own homes. The technologies currently covered by the scheme are:
  • Biomass heating systems
  • Ground or water source heat pumps
  • Air to water heat pumps
  • Solar thermal panels
Homeowners in England, Scotland and Wales can receive quarterly payments over a seven year period to fund the purchase and installation costs of a renewable heat source.
The scheme is open to anyone who can meet the joining requirements and it’s for households both off and on mains gas supply. 
For further details about the scheme including eligibility criteria and how to apply please click on the link below.
There is also a Non-Domestic RHI which has been running since November 2011 and is open to the non-domestic sector including industrial, commercial, public sector and not-for-profit organisations with eligible installations.
June 4, 2014Permalink